Creative Women Turn Hobbies into Career Aspirations

Trendsetting allows creative women to stand apart from their peers in different aspects of their job communities.

Jessie Langley, Los Angeles based fashion blogger at blushandblonde.com, Carsla Peyton, C.E.O. and founder of Connect-the-Cloths.com, and Christy Ann Siebers, theatre design major at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, similarly value confidence as the ultimate trendsetting tool for job prospects. Having turned hobbies into feasible career goals, they reveal their secrets to being confident in a career oriented environment.

Langley’s ultimate dream is to work for ‘Vogue.’ She had previously attended the ‘Lucky Magazine’ Fashion and Beauty Bloggers Conference on April 4 and 5 in Beverly Hills to educate herself in blogging success. This event featured keynote speakers and panelists like model Coco Rocha, Nicole Richie, fashion designer and television personality, Eva Chen, Editor-in-Chief of ‘Lucky Magazine,’ and more notables.

When asked about what makes a person a trendsetter, Langley said individualism is key.

“To be a trendsetter you have to showcase what makes you different, not what makes you the same. It’s about finding that perfect balance between personal style and current trends. It goes beyond what you wear. It’s about the kind of life you lead,” Langley said.

Langley also lists confidence as an important quality for a trendsetter.

“You need to be confident above all else. Know your style. Know why it’s your style. Show others why it should be their style, too. Confidence is the ultimate accessory,” Langley said.

Langley is originally from Georgia and although she considers herself a rookie-blogger, she intends to be rookie of the year.

Peyton also values confidence. She said that trendsetting begins by being a leader.

“To be a trendsetter means being a leader. It’s a matter of doing your own one-of-a-kind thing,” Peyton said.

Peyton said this type of person is not typical and is able to follow their own path.

“A trendsetter is an outcast of sorts that doesn’t necessarily play by the rules. He or she doesn’t mind taking fashion risks, is not greatly influenced by mainstream and doesn’t care what others think,” Peyton said.

Peyton earned two Bachelor’s degrees from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas in 2012. She studied journalism with an emphasis in integrated marketing communication and sociology. She also achieved a minor in entertainment management.

Feeling dissatisfied with her six month experience as an intern, she engaged in entrepreneurial endeavors. As a result, Connect-the-Cloths was born on Sept. 17, 2013.

Siebers will graduate this May from UWSP with a lot of costume design experience under her belt. Post graduation, she will tour the country working as a costume designer. Siebers aspires to one day have her own fashion line. She notes how trends in costume design are affected by those in fashion.

“To be a good costume designer, you have to know trends in fashion,” Siebers said.

Siebers lists Lady Gaga as a person she would love to style.

“It’s always been a dream of mine to work with Lady Gaga. She’s exactly what I look for in a trendsetter,” Siebers said.

Siebers values Gaga’s style as wearable art, which combines elements of costume, art, and fashion. While she lists Gaga as a person she would like to style, Siebers looks to deceased fashion designer Edith Head as inspiration for her career path and says Tim Burton is also a person that she would like to work with.

“I like how costume designs for Tim Burton are very picturesque,” Siebers said.

Siebers’ career aspirations are not short of sight as she continues to reach out to her following with career updates and tips on her website christysiebers.webs.com. She pictures herself doing many things in film, fashion, and costume design.

All women have made an effort to stand out when approaching their career goals. Confidence, individualism, and goal setting are key to the trendsetting mix. Although trendsetting is valued differently among job communities in fashion, it seems that dedication is valued equally among prospects.

Julia Flaherty

JFlah017@uwsp.edu

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