Alcohol Awareness Week Aims to Influence Students
Chris Cleworth and Kevin Martin, juniors, play Mario Kart while wearing drunk goggles to simulate drunk driving. Photo by Emily Hoffmann.

Alcohol Awareness Week Aims to Influence Students

Alcohol consumption among college students may not be a shock, but some may be surprised to learn how much their body can handle before a buzz turns into depression.

The Center for Prevention sponsored games and activities for the National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness week last week, holding events to educate students on the safest ways to consume alcohol.

Joey Montaine, freshman, Kevin Martin and Chris Cleworth, juniors, wear drunk goggles while playing Mario Kart to simulate drunk driving. Photo by Emily Hoffmann.

Joey Montaine, freshman, Kevin Martin and Chris Cleworth, juniors, wear drunk goggles while playing Mario Kart to simulate drunk driving. Photo by Emily Hoffmann.

“At first, alcohol serves as an upper, making you feel happy,” said Ashley Wilkinson, the event coordinator and substance abuse prevention specialist. “But after a certain amount, alcohol becomes a depressive substance. In order to feel the most positive effects and the least amount of negative, I suggest one to two drinks within the first hour and one drink every hour following.”

One event, “What’s In Your Cup?,” challenged students’ concept of what one drink should look like. Participants were asked their beverage of choice and to pour the amount they normally consume. They were then shown how many servings this equals.

“People are often surprised by the amount of single servings they’ll consume in one night,” Wilkinson said. “That’s why I suggest a slow drinking process. You can even substitute water for an alcoholic beverage. No one will ever know, and that way you stay in a good place.”

There were also events held to give students healthy alternatives to drinking. Yoga and meditation club held the event “Stress-Free” Monday night that offered a presentation on the mental and physical health effects of alcohol abuse along with a half-hour meditation.

Last Wednesday, Knutzen Hall held “Impaired Mario Kart,” where students wore drunk goggles and played a racing video game. Whoever came out with the least amount of crashes was the winner.

Chris Cleworth, junior, plays Mario Kart while wearing drunk goggles to simulate drunk driving. Photo by Emily Hoffmann.

Chris Cleworth, junior, plays Mario Kart while wearing drunk goggles to simulate drunk driving. Photo by Emily Hoffmann.

Chris Cleworth, a community advisor in Knutzen Hall, teamed up with Wilkinson for the event.

“I think it’s important,” Cleworth said. “It gives kids a good idea on how much two drinks can alter your driving abilities.”

Psychology major Kevin Marth participated in the drunken driving simulation and found it really hit home.

“Alcoholism runs in my family, so I thought it would be a good idea to experience something like this without actually putting anyone in danger,” Marth said.

 

Sophie Stickelmaier
Reporter
sstic520@uwsp.edu

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