The Quick and Dirty: Do most women orgasm during sex?

The quick and dirty… Your column for quick tips on reproductive health, sex and relationships.

As reproductive health peer educators on campus, you can imagine we receive some interesting questions, and we love it.

Q: As a woman, how common is it to never orgasm during sex?

A: If you are talking about heterosexual penis and vagina sex alone, it is not very common to orgasm as a woman. The vagina is not very sensitive and is not constructed to achieve an orgasm. Most women achieve orgasm through stimulating the clitoris that is super sensitive and pleasure focused. Some even compare the clitoris to the penis in terms of pleasure, but there are more nerve endings. Instead of focusing on vaginal versus clitoral orgasms, it is best to think about the whole area as a network of muscles and nerves that, if stimulated correctly, can result in an orgasm.

According to the National Sex Study from the Center for Sexual Health Promotion, women are more likely to orgasm when they engage in a variety of sex acts and when oral and vaginal intercourse are included. Either direct stimulation or sex positions that stimulate the clitoris are most likely to result in an orgasm.

64 percent of women said they had an orgasm the last time they participated in sexual acts compared to 85 percent of men according to a national sex study.

On average, women take longer to reach maximum arousal than men. The gender disparity can sometimes cause problems for couples during sex because of the different physiological responses and desires. Men may want to go before the woman is ready which is likely to result in women not having an orgasm. Of course, this is just a generalization and individuals do not necessarily reflect the normality and statistics, which is okay.

Many women believe they will never have an orgasm, but they might not know what works for their body or have not had proper time to become aroused. Everyone is unique, and it takes time to get to know and understand your body.

In short, a little over half of women reported having an orgasm during the last time they participated in sexual acts, but this was not just penis and vagina sex. Other forms of intercourse increase the likelihood of having an orgasm.

Check out our Facebook page, UWSP Reproductive Health Peer Educators, for the survey link so we can anonymously answer your questions in our next column.

 

Health.Services-RHPE@uwsp.edu

About pointer

pointer

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*